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New Angle: Doc U Fellows Screening 2019

May 5, 2019

The New Angle: Doc U Fellows Screening will take place at SPNN on Saturday, June 1st.

SPNN's first year of the Doc U Fellows program for early-career filmmakers is coming to a close with a public community screening and celebration of the fellows' six documentaries. All six films will premiere on Saturday, June 1st between 12:00pm and 7:30pm at SPNN. There is limited seating available on a first-come basis. Screening times will be shared in the coming weeks.

Xiaolu Wang, Tahiel Jimenez, Georgia Fort, Aida Alkadi, Phil Prospers, Lizzie Hutchins and Cameron Yang spent the past seven months in SPNN's Doc U Fellows program during which they learned from visiting artists everything from advanced cinematography to grant-writing to distribution. They worked fervently to capture compelling and powerful stories in the community to tell through film. Filmmakers will be presenting short artist talks (some with their subjects) following some of the screenings.

Learn more about the films below.

  • Fighting Femicide by Georgia Fort

    On a quest for solutions to femicide, we find survivors on their own journey looking for ways to end the cycle of violence.

  • MN to Chicago: Looking for a Cure by Aida Al-Kadi

    (Work in progress) When a mother can't find answers for her daughter's chronic illness, sickle cell anemia, they decide to leave everything behind. They move from Minneapolis to Chicago with promises of a new cure for the disease: stem cell transplants. Is it too late?

  • My Inheritance by Lizzie Hutchins

    A young woman investigates ovarian cancer, the “silent killer”, which took her grandmother’s life at 37, causing concern for her own health.

  • For Justice Forgotten by Phil Prospers

    In 2015, Jamar Clark was shot and killed by Minneapolis police in 61 seconds after they arrived on the scene. The North Side community cannot move forward because there are more questions than answers. Phil shares his story of trauma created by police violence.

  • Peb by Cameron Yang

    A Queer, Transgender, second-generation Hmong American individual explores the root of their depression by confronting their family's intergenerational trauma. Through this painful yet liberating experience, they hope to pass these stories and experiences to their children. This film is about peb peb leeg, us three.

  • The Subversive Sirens by Xiaolu Wang and Tahiel Jimenez

    A documentary following the inner lives of seven artists and activists who break out into the world of synchronized swimming as an act of political warfare. They represent an intersection of multiple identities and desires, and they fight for Black liberation, equity in the aquatic arts, body positivity, and queer visibility.